London Marathon 2016: Army captain David Seath dies after collapse

Captain David Seath who died running the London marathon. See SWNS story SWRUNNER: The runner who died during the London Marathon was named yesterday as a popular Army captain. David Seath, 31, collapsed just three miles short of the finish line from a suspected cardiac arrest.Dozens of police and paramedics rushed to his aid and he was taken to St. Thomas' Hospital but was pronounced dead shortly afterwards.His devastated friends are now planning to walk the final three miles and complete his run in his honour.

With deepest sympathy

Captain David Seath who died running the London marathon.

An Army captain who collapsed while running the London Marathon has died.

Afghanistan veteran David Seath, 31, had a cardiac arrest three miles short of the finish, near the 23-mile mark, close to Southwark Bridge.

Captain David Seath who died running the London marathon. See SWNS story SWRUNNER: The runner who died during the London Marathon was named yesterday as a popular Army captain. David Seath, 31, collapsed just three miles short of the finish line from a suspected cardiac arrest.Dozens of police and paramedics rushed to his aid and he was taken to St. Thomas' Hospital but was pronounced dead shortly afterwards.His devastated friends are now planning to walk the final three miles and complete his run in his honour.

He received immediate medical attention and was rushed to St Thomas’ Hospital but died later.

Mr Seath’s friends are planning to complete the marathon in his honour, starting at the place where he collapsed.

“We will walk as one, the final three miles of the marathon, starting where he fell,” wrote Capt James Walker-McClimens on a fundraising page set up following his death.

Mr Walker-McClimens served with Mr Seath in the 19th Regiment The Royal Artillery The Highland Gunners in Tidworth.

They both went on tour to Afghanistan in 2012, returning at the same time.

“He was the greatest type of guy you could imagine – everyone loved him. He was funny, outgoing, generous – he was just not a bad guy in any way shape or form.”

“In the Army we don’t like unfinished business. It was something he wanted to do, he wanted to do the full marathon, so we are going to complete it for him,” he said.

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